Tag: Aristotle

The Christian Humanist Podcast, Episode #134: Cain

General Introduction – Nathan levels up! – Listener feedback – Christian naturism – Rogers, Rogers everywhere – Telos and Matthew 5:48 – Christian college and losing one’s faith – The problem with universal morality The Genesis Account – The first mortal born of humans – A function name, not an origin name – Cain’s sacrifice…

The Christian Humanist Podcast, Episode #133: Psychology

General Introduction – Stay tuned ‘til the end for listener feedback Aristotelian Psychology – What does Aristotle mean by soul? – The soul and the body – Dante’s interpolation – Your undecaying mind – The final cause of the body – Types of souls – Thomas’s additions Christology and Psychology – The Nicene Creed –…

The Christian Humanist Podcast, Episode #132: Physics

General Introduction  – Our special guest – Listener feedback – I dream of The Christian Humanist Podcast – C.S. Lewis and universalism – In which we explain pop culture to David Grubbs – Tolkien and Ransom – Anti-vaccination and the Internet – Bible episodes Aristotelian Physics – Phusis and natura – From dirt to gods…

The Christian Humanist Podcast, Episode #131

General Introduction – A full slate of PhDs – Listener feedback – Some Lewis corrections and additions – A technical comment, plagued by technical problems – Yes, Grubbs knows about Tolkien’s Beowulf Hebrew Science – Our desert God – Weather as punishment – Deus ex turbine – The God who is not in the wind…

Christian Humanist Profiles, Episode #5: Honoring the Question

One of the persistent heroes of philosophically minded folks is Socrates, the godfatherof question-askers, the Athenian philosopher, the drinker of hemlock. Although the Platonic dialogues never present him as entirely averse to speech-making, nonetheless, Socrates, in the Apology, famously describes himself as one who doesn’t relay divine wisdom to mortals so much as he asks questions…

Christian Humanist Profiles, Episode #4: Job Through the Ages

Perhaps no book in the Hebrew Bible is more disturbing, befuddling, and thought-provoking than The Book of Job. Believers and nonbelievers alike have wrestled like the ideas and emotions put forth in this strange text for millennia now—and unsurprisingly, they’ve come to few shared conclusions about it, other than perhaps about its enduring greatness and…

Christian Humanist Profiles, Episode #3: Martial Arts, Positive Psychology, and Virtue Ethics

When human beings want to tell stories, we often speak tales of the warrior.  Whether one reads about Saul and David, the holy warlords of ancient Israel, or about Diomedes and Ajax and Achilles of the Achaians and Hector of Troy, or the Samurai or the Shao-Lin or the Zulu or the Berserkers, what surfaces…

Blogging through Truth and Method post 13: The Development of the Concept of Language in the History of Western Thought (405-438)

You can generally count on me to look for the historical conditions that surround anything interesting, so Gadamer’s section of Truth and Method on the concept of language immediately pleased me, starting as it does with the ancient Greeks and tracing the ways that the concept “language” travels across ages.  Such investigations remind us that…

The Christian Humanist Podcast, Episode #107: Medieval 101

General Introduction  – A busy summer – How we spent our summer vacations – Three big announcements The Middle Ages and Antiquity – The Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire – Rhetorical constructs – A slow and varied process – How did the Medievals see themselves? The Middle Ages and the Modern World –…

Blogging through Truth and Method post 10: The Recovery of the Fundamental Hermeneutic Problem (307-341)

  Once upon a time, hermeneutics conceived of understanding as involving two processes: understanding and interpretation, to which Pietism added a third, application. The great advance of the Romantics is that they understood the degree to which interpretation and understanding are the same thing; once this truth was arrived at, language became an important piece…

Blogging through Truth and Method, post 4: Play as the Clue to Ontological Explanation (101-134)

Gadamer’s analysis of aesthetics will be oriented around the notion of play, but he wants to liberate the concept from the subjective bearing that it finds in the work of Kant and Schiller. Were we thinking subjectively, we would talk about play being a state of mind of the player herself; instead, Gadamer is interested…

The Christian Humanist Podcast, Episode #81: Realism

General Introduction – Why we don’t have a Dr. Who episode – The Facebook page So What Is Realism? – The Oxford Guide weighs in – Realism vs. unbelievability – Artistic movements – Architectural realism – The discarding of decoration Realism Before Realism – The probable and the possible – Realism vs. nominalism – Iconography…

The Christian Humanist, Episode #75: Ante-Dante

General Introduction – Disappointing David Grubbs – Listener feedback – Stroking and broking the ego – (Yeah, my math is off) – A correction – Theologico et Ratio Translations – Old Lady Sayers – End notes, not footnotes – Reproducing rhyme and meter – Ciardi’s middle ground – Musa, king of Dante – Wikipedia as…

The Christian Humanist Podcast, Episode #72: Patience

General Introduction – Listener feedback – Who’s listening? – What’s on the blog? – Formatting a dissertation The Patience of Job – The patience of Job? – Gregory the Great (again!) – Shall we blame his friends? – The plurality of wisdom literature – Interrogating James – Humility and patience New Testament Patience – Fruit…

The Christian Humanist Podcast, Episode #70: Epistemology

General Introduction – Dr. Gilmour!!! – We kid because we envy – Listener feedback – The delay in show notes – What’s on the blog? What Is Epistemology? – It’s all indirectly Greek to me – Mise en abyme – Connection to metaphysics – Epistemology junkies – Invoking epistemology to affirm or deny metaphysics Ancient…