Tag: Hans-Georg Gadamer

Reading Through Principles of Christian Theology part 4: Chapter 6

MacQuarrie has been interested from the very beginning of Principles of Christian Theology in the ability or inability of human language to express the experiences and revelations that make up the beginnings of religion. The first sentence of the book, after all, says that theology “seeks to express the content of this faith in the…

Christian Humanist Profiles 12: Structuralism, Modern Literature, and Christianity

Anyone who’s spent any time at all with the New Testament is familiar with the opening sentences of the Gospel of John: “In the beginning was the Word, and the Word was with God, and the Word was God. He was in the beginning with God. All things came into being through Him, and apart…

The Christian Humanist Podcast, Episode #143: Proofs for God

Nathan Gilmour hosts a conversation about the five “proofs of God” from the opening sections of Thomas Aquinas’s Summa Theologiae. Our discussion ranges over what a proof is for, whether the ontology in the proofs holds up post-Kant, whether reason and revelation can really be friends, and all sorts of groovy philosophical things. Our intro music…

Christian Humanist Profiles 10: Kierkegaard’s Concept of Faith

Ever since the English-speaking world discovered the work of Søren Kierkegaard in the middle part of the last century, he has been an indispensable part of the Western philosophical and theological traditions. He is seen, variously, as a precursor to movements as diverse as existentialism, poststructuralism, evangelicalism, and neo-orthodoxy. Few people make it through higher…

The Christian Humanist Podcast, Episode #140: Answers to Your Questions

We answer your emails today! If you’d like to be included on a future listener-feedback episode, send your comments, complaints, critiques, or criticism to thechristianhumanist@gmail.com. Here are the time marks for the individual emails and subjects, should you wish to skip ahead. [03:05] Mark Heard and listener feedback about listener feedback. (See below.) [04:29] Karl…

The Christian Humanist Podcast, Episode #126.1: Postmodernism 101

General Introduction – Snowpocalypse, Round Two – Sprezzatura, sprezzatura – Listener feedback – American folk The Postmodern Condition – The age of networked computers – Incredulity toward metanarratives – Speculation and emancipation – What counts as knowledge(s)? – Description or prescription Foucault – Structuralism begets poststructuralism – Power manifesting itself in society – Pessimistic description…

The Christian Humanist Podcast, Episode #113: Tradition

General Introduction – The Christian Feminist Podcast – Christian Humanist Profiles – The once and future host Tradition and Roman Law – Intangible inheritances – Tradition as betrayal – To translate is to betray – The Roman Catholic meaning Tradition vs. Progress – A function of the Enlightenment – An improvement on inheritance – Where…

Blogging through Truth and Method post 14: Language as Horizon of a Hermeneutical Ontology (439-491)

As Gadamer brings Truth and Method to its finish, the qualification and critique of other systems of aesthetics and hermeneutics comes to a close and the book’s own positive project takes its shape.  Ultimately the truth of art, as the final chapter unfolds it, is a linguistic truth, the sort of thing whose own examination…

Blogging through Truth and Method post 13: The Development of the Concept of Language in the History of Western Thought (405-438)

You can generally count on me to look for the historical conditions that surround anything interesting, so Gadamer’s section of Truth and Method on the concept of language immediately pleased me, starting as it does with the ancient Greeks and tracing the ways that the concept “language” travels across ages.  Such investigations remind us that…

Blogging through Truth and Method post 12: Language as the Medium of Hermeneutic Experience (383-405)

Conversation is a funny thing; though we sometimes speak of the participants in a conversation “directing it,” in fact the conversation seems to direct itself, seems to be something experienced rather than controlled by the participants. Something emerges in a conversation that did not exist beforehand but which exists afterwards. Language, then, is the place…

Blogging through Truth and Method post 11: Analysis of Historically Effected Consciousness (341-379)

The problem with which the previous section (307-341) of Truth and Method ends is truly compelling, if one breaks down the problem as a (simplified) syllogism: Hermeneutics, as a practice, involves the dialectic of interpreting the whole text in terms of any given part and interpreting any given part in light of the whole text.…

Blogging through Truth and Method post 10: The Recovery of the Fundamental Hermeneutic Problem (307-341)

  Once upon a time, hermeneutics conceived of understanding as involving two processes: understanding and interpretation, to which Pietism added a third, application. The great advance of the Romantics is that they understood the degree to which interpretation and understanding are the same thing; once this truth was arrived at, language became an important piece…

Blogging through Truth and Method post 9: The Elevation of the Historicity of Understanding (265-307)

With the brief history of hermeneutical thinking in the book, Gadamer turns in this section of Truth and Method to constructing a hermeneutics that takes seriously the thrown-and-projected nature of Dasein that he finds to familiar in Heidegger. How Dasein Does Hermeneutics In Being and Time, Heidegger re-imagines time not as something through which beings…

Blogging through Truth and Method post 8: Overcoming the Epistemological Problem (242-264)

  Husserl brought the entire notion of the given—so important for German idealism—into question; in so doing, he moved beyond Dilthey, at least to a certain extent. In fact, an examination of Husserl’s books reveals that he disbelieved entirely in the sort of objectivism proffered by Dilthey and many other nineteenth-century philosophers. Phenomenology is rather…