Tag: Walter Kaufmann

A Primer on Religious Existentialism, Pt. 4: Augustine

As I mentioned last week, the academic dean of the secondary literature on existentialism, Walter Kaufmann, points to the Christian theologians St. Augustine and Blaise Pascal as early examples of existentialist thought. He does so in a rather unhelpful and patronizing way: If we look for anything remotely similar [to Dostoevsky’s Notes from Underground] in…

A Primer on Religious Existentialism, Pt. 3: Hellenism and Hebraism

There’s a degree to which it’s legitimate to claim Judeo-Christian roots for almost all Western philosophies (including the scientism that seeks, in its more recent and ugly manifestations, to destroy religious faith altogether), but Existentialism has a special claim, I think. Most wide-scale histories of the movement include an early space for religious belief. Walter…

A New Kind of Hegelianism

Nathan Gilmour has (publicly and privately) referred several times to Emergent theology—or, so I’m sure not to oversimplify a complex and varied intellectual movement, to the version of Emergent theology set forward in Brian McLaren’s latest book—as a sort of Neo-Hegelianism. Nor is he the only critic to make that claim. McLaren’s friend Scot McKnight,…