Tag: hermeneutics

Christian Humanist Profiles 167: Introducing Medieval Interpretation

Perhaps no era of biblical interpretation is less appreciated than the Middle Ages. After all, weren’t the medievals at best just perpetuators of patristic readings, and at worst the most unbounded and fantastic of allegorists? If the scholars of the Middle Ages are recovered these days, it is usually for their mystically- or philosophically-inflected theologies,…

Christian Humanist Profiles 139: Honey of Souls

In the early 6th century, darkness was falling on the Rome’s Western Empire. Old Rome was waning, barbarians sat on the imperial throne, and smouldering tension with the Byzantine Eastern Empire threatened to explode at any moment. In this time of crisis, a man from an old Italian family, trained in orthodox Christianity and classical…

The Christian Feminist Podcast, Episode #63: The Handmaid’s Tale

y Knowing Background on the novel and television show (taken largely from this NYT piece) Our experiences with the novel Our summer series and Victoria’s fifteen-year Handmaid’s Tale journey Reading Dystopia by Prooftexting Why Serena Joy is much younger Passing On Angela Jade Bastien’s HT reviews Iran Awakening The American Solidarity Part

Christian Humanist Profiles 81: Reading Matthew with Monks

Ora et labora: Pray and work. This directive has ordered the life of Benedictine monastics for centuries, each day’s rhythm of worship and toil shaping the soul toward love and humility. But this Benedictine life creates other kinds of change as well: it can shape how a monk reads the Bible. In his book, Reading…

Christian Humanist Profiles 10: Kierkegaard’s Concept of Faith

Ever since the English-speaking world discovered the work of Søren Kierkegaard in the middle part of the last century, he has been an indispensable part of the Western philosophical and theological traditions. He is seen, variously, as a precursor to movements as diverse as existentialism, poststructuralism, evangelicalism, and neo-orthodoxy. Few people make it through higher…

Blogging through Truth and Method post 14: Language as Horizon of a Hermeneutical Ontology (439-491)

As Gadamer brings Truth and Method to its finish, the qualification and critique of other systems of aesthetics and hermeneutics comes to a close and the book’s own positive project takes its shape.  Ultimately the truth of art, as the final chapter unfolds it, is a linguistic truth, the sort of thing whose own examination…

Blogging through Truth and Method post 11: Analysis of Historically Effected Consciousness (341-379)

The problem with which the previous section (307-341) of Truth and Method ends is truly compelling, if one breaks down the problem as a (simplified) syllogism: Hermeneutics, as a practice, involves the dialectic of interpreting the whole text in terms of any given part and interpreting any given part in light of the whole text.…

Blogging through Truth and Method post 9: The Elevation of the Historicity of Understanding (265-307)

With the brief history of hermeneutical thinking in the book, Gadamer turns in this section of Truth and Method to constructing a hermeneutics that takes seriously the thrown-and-projected nature of Dasein that he finds to familiar in Heidegger. How Dasein Does Hermeneutics In Being and Time, Heidegger re-imagines time not as something through which beings…

Blogging through Truth and Method post 7: Dilthey's Entanglement in the Aporias of Historicism (218-241)

The section of Truth and Method that contains this chapter is called “Historical Preparations,” and one of the oddities of blogging about it is that I’m writing about an entire section dedicated to a philosopher I’d not heard about until I’d read this book. Wilhelm Dilthey is a post-Hegelian German philosopher whose written works were…

Listening to the Bible when You’re Hard of Hearing: A Response to Chris Rollston by Nathan Gilmour, Wes Arblaster, and Micah Weedman

It was 1851, at the Women’s Convention in Akron, Ohio that a former slave stepped up to the platform and became one of the most powerful voices for Abolitionism and Women’s Rights of the era.   Her chosen instrument of liberation?  The Bible.   Without any historical, literary, or hermeneutical expertise she discovered in its pages a…

Bible, Tradition, Authority Part 2: The Power of God

Part 1: The Nature of God Thomas and Omnipotence A person reading the first fifteen or so questions from Thomas Aquinas’s Summa Theologica might miss it, but it’s in there: God is not omnipotent. In fact, God is, in Thomas’s account, as far from omnipotent as one could imagine; God is a being without potens.…