Tag: Psalms

Christian Humanist Profiles 171: Psalms as a Grammar for Faith

Stream or download this episode. Late in his posthumously-published Philosophical Investigations, in section 373, Ludwig Wittgenstein presents a cryptic aphorism regarding grammar: “Grammar tells what kind of object anything is. (Theology as grammar.)”  That thought has offered teasing possibilities to people of faith as long as we’ve read Wittgenstein, and one fascinating project arising from…

Christian Humanist Profiles 139: Honey of Souls

In the early 6th century, darkness was falling on the Rome’s Western Empire. Old Rome was waning, barbarians sat on the imperial throne, and smouldering tension with the Byzantine Eastern Empire threatened to explode at any moment. In this time of crisis, a man from an old Italian family, trained in orthodox Christianity and classical…

Sin-Questions: A Reflection on the Lectionary Readings for 9 March 2014

Revised Common Lectionary Page for 9 March 2014 (First Sunday of Lent, Year A) Genesis 2:15-17; 3:1-7  • Psalm 32  • Romans 5:12-19  • Matthew 4:1-11 In N.T. Wright’s The New Testament and the People of God, he argues that all world-stories (I like that term better than world-views, largely because it doesn’t try to turn moving pictures…

The Righteous Sinner: A Reflection on the Lectionary Readings for 26 February 2012

Revised Common Lectionary Page for 26 February 2012 (First Sunday of Lent, Year B) Genesis 9:8-17  •  Psalm 25:1-10  •  1 Peter 3:18-22  •  Mark 1:9-15 When I do preach this on Sunday, I’m going to preach the entire Psalm, in case anyone is wondering.  My essay here will reflect all 22 verses, not just the first ten. This likely makes…

Attack of the Pathetic Fallacy

I do not recall when I first encountered the notion of a pathetic fallacy: a literature course, doubtless, but I’ve had many of those. I was almost certainly an undergraduate, because the pathetic fallacy was introduced simply as a term, with a plain, dry definition; I was told nothing of its connotative implications, and we…